Home Health News Scientists discover SIX new coronaviruses in bats that are in the same family that causes COVID-19 – Daily Mail

Scientists discover SIX new coronaviruses in bats that are in the same family that causes COVID-19 – Daily Mail

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Scientists discover SIX new coronaviruses lurking in bats that are in the same family as the SARS-CoV2 that causes COVID-19 – but they are not genetically related

  • Six new coronviruses have been found in  three different species of bats
  • The viruses are in the same family as the SARS-CoV2 that causes COVID-19 
  • The team noted that they are not genetically related to the current outbreak 
  • Learn more about how to help people impacted by COVID

Scientists have discovered six new coronavirus in Myanmar-based bats.

The viruses are said to be in the same family as the SARS-CoV2 that causes COVID-19, but are not genetically related to the current outbreak. 

The new viruses were found in three different species: the Great Asiatic yellow house bat, the wrinkle-lipped free tailed bat and the Horsefield’s leaf-nosed bat.

The team notes that additional studies will be necessary to determine if the newfound coronaviruses have ‘the potential for transmission across species to better understand the risks to human health’.

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Scientists have discovered six new coronavirus in Myanmar-based bats. The viruses are said to be in the same family as the SARS-CoV2 that causes COVID-19, but are not genetically related to the current outbreak (stock photo)

Scientists have discovered six new coronavirus in Myanmar-based bats. The viruses are said to be in the same family as the SARS-CoV2 that causes COVID-19, but are not genetically related to the current outbreak (stock photo)

Scientists have discovered six new coronavirus in Myanmar-based bats. The viruses are said to be in the same family as the SARS-CoV2 that causes COVID-19, but are not genetically related to the current outbreak (stock photo)

COVID-19 first made headlines in Wuhan, China December 2019 and has since infected nearly every country in the world.

As of Tuesday, there are more than 1.9 million confirmed cases and the death toll has surpassed 119,000.

However, the US has been hit the hardest by COVID-19 with more than 588,000 cases and over 23,000 deaths.

The latest researchers was conducted by the Smithsonian’s Global Health Program, which they hope will help experts ‘understand the diversity of coronaviruses in bats and inform global efforts to detect, prevent and respond to infectious diseases that may threaten public health, particularly in light of the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic.’

The new viruses were found in three different species: the Great Asiatic yellow house bat (pictured), the wrinkle-lipped free tailed bat and the Horsefield's leaf-nosed bat

The new viruses were found in three different species: the Great Asiatic yellow house bat (pictured), the wrinkle-lipped free tailed bat and the Horsefield's leaf-nosed bat

The new viruses were found in three different species: the Great Asiatic yellow house bat (pictured), the wrinkle-lipped free tailed bat and the Horsefield’s leaf-nosed bat

Marc Valitutto, former wildlife veterinarian with the Smithsonian’s Global Health Program and lead author of the study, said in a statement: ‘Viral pandemics remind us how closely human health is connected to the health of wildlife and the environment.’

‘Worldwide, humans are interacting with wildlife with increasing frequency, so the more we understand about these viruses in animals—what allows them to mutate and how they spread to other species––the better we can reduce their pandemic potential.’

The team gathered saliva and fecal samples from 11 different species of bats in parts of Myanmar, a country in Southeast Asia that borders Bangladesh and India.

COVID-19 first made headlines in Wuhan, China December 2019 and has since infected nearly every country in the world. As of Tuesday, there are more than 1.9 million confirmed cases and the death toll has surpassed 119,000

COVID-19 first made headlines in Wuhan, China December 2019 and has since infected nearly every country in the world. As of Tuesday, there are more than 1.9 million confirmed cases and the death toll has surpassed 119,000

COVID-19 first made headlines in Wuhan, China December 2019 and has since infected nearly every country in the world. As of Tuesday, there are more than 1.9 million confirmed cases and the death toll has surpassed 119,000

However, the US has been hit the hardest by COVID-19 with more than 588,000 cases and over 23,000 deaths

However, the US has been hit the hardest by COVID-19 with more than 588,000 cases and over 23,000 deaths

However, the US has been hit the hardest by COVID-19 with more than 588,000 cases and over 23,000 deaths

Altogether there were more than 750 samples gathered from May 2016 through August 2018.

The samples were then tested and compared to other known coronaviruses, which resulted in six new ones.

One was also found in other parts of Southeast Asia, but never before seen in Myanmar.

According to LiveScience, the six coronaviruses were given new names: PREDICT-CoV-90 (found in the Asiatic yellow house bat), PREDICT-CoV-47 and PREDICT-CoV-82 (found in the wrinkle-lipped free-tailed bat) and PREDICT-CoV-92, -93 and -96, which were found in the leaf-nosed bat.

Suzan Murray, director of the Smithsonian’s Global Health Program and co-author of the study, said: ‘Many coronaviruses may not pose a risk to people, but when we identify these diseases early on in animals, at the source, we have a valuable opportunity to investigate the potential threat.’

‘Vigilant surveillance, research and education are the best tools we have to prevent pandemics before they occur.’

DID THE U.S. KNOW ABOUT CORONAVIRUS IN NOVEMBER? HOW A CRISIS UNFOLDED

November 17, 2019: Date China now says it has traced the first coronavirus infection to, in Hubei province. Data now suggests that there were up to five new cases each day for the next few days. If U.S. intelligence was aware of such an outbreak, it suggests an excellent source or deep infiltration of Chinese government communications

‘Late November.’ ABC News reports that National Center for Medical Intelligence (NCMI) produced a report detailing concerns about a contagion in the area around Wuhan. The NCMI denies such a ‘product/assessment’ existed ‘in November of 2019’

November 28: Thanksgiving. ABC News says the intelligence that there is a mystery illness in and around Wuhan is in circulation among U.S. agencies by the holiday

December 1: The first case which has now been concluded to have happened without direct exposure to the Wuhan wet market is recorded

‘December’: ABC News reports that warnings of contagion around Wuhan are circulating extensively in U.S. intelligence circles

December 17: First double-digit rise in cases in Wuhan and region

December 27: Zhang Jixian, a doctor at Hubei Provincial Hospital of Integrated Chinese and Western Medicine, tells China’s CDC equivalent that he believes the mystery illnesses are caused by a new – novel – coronavirus

December 31: China reports the existence of cases of pneumonia with an unknown cause in Wuhan to the World Health Organization, saying they started on December 12. Confirmed cases stand at 266

January 1: Chinese authorities close the Wuhan wet market, in the belief that wild animals sold for meat may have been the source of the virus, Confirmed cases are 281

January 3: Alex Azar, HHS secretary, and other health officials are first warned about contagion in China. President’s daily briefing is reported by CNN to include a warning about the outbreak in Wuhan for the first time; the Washington Post however suggests it was some days after this

January 5: SARS and MERS are not the source of the pneumonia infections, China says

January 7: Novel coronavirus is reported to have been isolated by Chinese authorities

January 9: First reported death from the virus, a 61-year-old man said to have been exposed at the wet market

January 11: WHO are told by China’s national health commission – its equivalent of the CDC – that the outbreak is associated with the Wuhan wet market

January 16: Japanese authorities report the first infection outside China, a man who traveled to Wuhan

January 20: Dr Tony Fauci announces the NIH has started work on a virus

January 20: First case on U.S. soil is reported in Washington, a 35-year-old man who had been in Wuhan

January 22: Donald Trump addresses coronavirus for the first time when he is interviewed by CNBC’s Squawkbox at Davos. ‘Are there worries about a pandemic at this point?’ he is asked by anchor Joe Kernen, and answers: ‘No. Not at all. And we have it totally under control. It’s one person coming in from China, and we have it under control. It’s going to be just fine.’

January 29: Peter Navarro writes ‘memo for the president’ warning of up to 5 million dead Americans and a $6 trillion hit on the economy from the virus. On April 7 Trump says he ‘never read it’ then on April 8 dodges whether he was briefed on it saying he does not remember 

 

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